Spring Break STEM Programs in Westchester County

The Digital Arts Experience

Starting next week, The Digital Arts Experience in White Plains, Westchester County NY will be running Spring Break STEM programs for kids and teens in 3D Printing, Animation, Coding, Design, Electronics and more!

Spring 2015 STEM Camp Westchester

Spring Recess Tech Camp 1 Sessions available from Mar 30 – Apr 3, 2015

Click here to see the full schedule and register!

USE PROMO CODE: SPBREAK TO RECEIVE $25 OFF ENROLLMENT!


CAN’T MAKE NEXT WEEK? JOIN US FOR THE FOLLOWING WEEK!

Spring 2015 STEM Camp

Spring Recess Tech Camp 2 Sessions available from Apr 6 – 10, 2015

Click here to see the full schedule and register!

USE PROMO CODE: SPBREAK TO RECEIVE $25 OFF ENROLLMENT!


Minecraft & League of Legends Tournament

JOIN US FOR OUR NEXT GAMING TOURNAMENT DAY! LEAGUE OF LEGENDS & MINECRAFT PVP: APRIL 25TH.

JOIN US FOR OUR NEXT GAMING TOURNAMENT DAY!

LEAGUE OF LEGENDS & MINECRAFT PVP: APRIL 25TH.
CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE & REGISTER!


Summer 2015 STEM Camp Westchester

We are now enrolling for our exciting Summer 2015 STEM Camps! Our summer programs start July 6th and run different programs all the way until the end of August. We have 5 different sessions:

Session 1 will run for 2-weeks from July 6th – July 17th.
Session 2 will run for 2-weeks from July 20th – July 31st
Session 3 will run for 2-weeks from August 3rd – August 14th
Session 4 will run for 2-weeks from August 17th – August 28th
Session 5 will run for 1-week at the end of the summer from August 31st to September 4th
Morning session from 9:30AM – 12:00PM.
Afternoon runs from 1:00PM – 3:30PM.

Students can attend for the full day where they choose a morning activity and a separate afternoon activity, or just come in for a half day!

CLICK HERE TO FIND OUR SUMMER STEM CAMP SCHEDULES!
SIGN UP EARLY & SAVE!

USE PROMO CODE: STEM2015 AT CHECKOUT AND RECEIVE 15% OFF A PROGRAM!

The Impact of Corporate Partners for Coworking Spaces

by Sam Melton

Verizon recently partnered with HarlemGarage to equip the Manhattan incubator space with Verizon FiOS Quantum Internet. HarlemGarage’s West 118th Street location will receive 6 months of Internet service pro bono from the provider to support the innovative companies that use the space.

This partnership, just one of many, illustrates the positive effect that alliances between coworking stations and large corporate enterprises can have on shared work spaces.

The concept of business incubators, developed in the late 1990s, has grown into a global network of collaborative work environments. Remote workers and start-up entrepreneurs, no longer confined to home offices and coffee shops, can now benefit from coworking sites, supported in part by big corporations. For start-ups and venture capital initiatives, the arrangement couldn’t be better. 

Members of coworking spaces have access to more opportunities and amenities than they would at other offsite locations – without individual responsibility for technical installations, updates and bills. With a single membership, a HarlemGarage participant can enjoy the benefits of an office space – like advanced technology, easy collaboration and free exchange of ideas – without the additional costs of managing services on their own.

But individual workers and small start-ups aren’t the only ones who benefit from coworking spaces and business incubators. Multinational corporations who partner with and provide service to collaborative workspaces are also seeing benefits.

Why Multinationals are Teaming Up with Coworking Sites

According to the 2013 Global Coworking Census, which surveyed 2,498 coworking spaces in 80 countries, Europe has the largest coworking presence, followed by North America and Asia. A growth segment in business leasing contracts, coworking sites have increased by 89% since 2012, a growth of more than 300% from 2010.

Multinational corporations spend a great deal of energy and capital on research and development, and entrepreneurial schemes are often the source of new innovation. Large organizations can add value to their portfolio without starting from scratch by acquiring start-ups after they go public. The truth is that major corporations are thirsty for new talent and ideas – something that start-ups and small companies often have in spades.

Business incubators are a great source of such intelligence. And supporting these ventures in a coworking space can enhance that value tenfold – shared spaces are often comprised of a number of savvy ventures waiting to be bought and capitalized on. Sponsorship of coworking enterprises allows large companies to donate finance, time and resources across sectors in a single contribution – and often get tangible returns.

Coworking spaces with corporate partners put start-ups and entrepreneurs in contact with high profile business networks that can have impact far into the future. And the resulting exchange of knowledge and ideas is a highly sought after resource for major organizations and their professionals. Smart professionals acknowledge that interacting with emerging names and startups in their fields at these sites is a substantial boon for their own careers.

Coworking spaces aren’t just good for those starting out – they’re also good for well-established, multinational corporations. Everyone wins. And it’s for this reason that the future of coworking partnerships with large organizations is bright.

Please feel free to see more of Sam’s work on his blog: http://sammeltontalks.blogspot.com/

The World’s Top Minds Discuss Branding in a Digital World | November 20th in Westchester

Learn more about the event and purchase tickets at http://howtostayinyourlane.eventbrite.com.

branding

Next week, The Digital Arts Experience (The DAE) will hold the first of its new DAE Discussion Series, “Branding in a Digital World: How to Stay in Your Lane.” This exciting and informative panel event will feature three of Westchester’s most prevalent branding authorities and will be moderated by Sara James, Director of Membership at the Business Council of Westchester. The event will open with a keynote on the relevance of branding by John Zanzarella, Chief Marketing Officer at Silverback Social.

Social media expert Chris Dessi (CEO of Silverback Social  and a Producer of the Westchester Digital Summit) teams up with Creative Director Sherry Bruck (Harquin Creative Group) and award-winning designer Brett Yancey Collins (counterspace) in a discussion that will inspire you rethink how your brand can work for YOU in an ever-changing digital landscape.

If you own a business, are starting a business, or you make a career of marketing, this is the event for you.

What you can expect to learn:

  • What your consumers retain about your brand.
  • How your brand can work for you in the digital age.
  • How to measure your brand’s impact on your audience.
  • What the drivers of brand credibility are.
What else you can expect from this evening:
  • A relaxing night of wine and hors d’eouvres
  • Networking with other creative professionals
  • Exploring The DAE’s innovative coworking community
Networking will begin at 6:30 PM, followed by a keynote at 7:00 PM with the panel beginning promptly at 7:15 PM.

SILVERBACK SOCIAL SAYS: Instagram Ads: 3 questions + A Fatal Flaw

This article was shared by our good friend Cristin Grogan, Chief Responsibility Officer at Silverback Social, an amazing social media marketing company.  Please visit them at SilverbackSocial.com.

After Instagram’s initial announcement that ads were coming to it’s social platform a few weeks ago, we didn’t hear anything more.  Just that they were happening “soon”.  Last week, we got our first glimpse into what they would look like.

Instagram Ad

Beyond the initial announcement and the first mockup of the ad, the whole event has been shrouded in secrecy.  There’s been no word on algorithms or how Instagram ads work.  And while I understand the hesitation of over-promising and under-delivering on Instagram’s part, I can’t help but have the following concerns when it comes to what we don’t know about sponsored posts coming to one of our most beloved social media platforms:

READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE HERE…

Coworking At Its Best: Prepping for the Westchester Digital Summit 2014

By Christina Collins, Account Manager for counterspace

How counterspace Joined the Coworking Community:

We were actively seeking a creative community to engage with last spring. We were looking for anything from a meet-up group to a networking organization- we didn’t really know exactly what, but we wanted to tap into or create ‘something’ where “creatives” could share, learn, network and grow. I had found The Digital Arts Experience online while on my quest for this so-called creative community we were looking for, but, to be completely honest, we didn’t really “get it.” Then, Brett [Yancy Collins, Owner and Creative Director of counterspace] created a meet-up for professional creatives in the Westchester/Fairfield area and Emily, on behalf of The DAE, saw the meet-up and sent Brett a note. When he told me that he got a note from a place called The Digital Arts Experience, I remembered that we had talked about it before and I was like “That’s the place I told you about in White Plains!” We decided we should meet with Emily and check the place out.

When we came in, The DAE was very quiet and there wasn’t much going on, but Brett knew right away that The DAE was a powerhouse waiting to explode and could be the place that he could tap into to host and grow a creative network. What we hadn’t thought about was working from here. After all, we had just moved into a loft space in downtown Port Chester not two months earlier! We left our meeting and Brett and I looked at each other and knew we wanted to try and figure out a way to make The DAE our home. But first, Brett wanted to meet with the founder, so I set up another meeting just to ensure personalities ‘jived.’ Brett, having been a part of creating a place similar to The DAE in Ohio called ‘The Works‘ many years ago and had much to chat about with founder Rob Kissner. We were excited to continue our ‘courtship’ with The DAE!

How counterspace Met Silverback Social:

It was that day that Rob and Emily introduced us to Silverback Social founder, Chris Dessi. Chris had tremendous energy and was gearing up for the first Westchester Digital Summit. Chris and Brett were after the same thing: creating a digital community in our backyards – Westchester, NY. Brett was doing it from a digital design perspective and Chris from a social media perspective, but they clearly were after that same sense of “Do it here. Do it now. And do it digitally.” And Chris was doing it so we were excited to see what the WDS was all about. We attended the [Westchester Digital] Summit the following week and soon after, told Rob we’d be moving in.

How counterspace Felt about Coworking:

We moved in right in the middle of producing a website for International Carseat maker, Diono. The pressure was on to produce the U.S. version of their site; we had crucial deadlines to meet. We were heads down and had no time to make friends! (Not sure what kind of first impression we made!) Meanwhile, all around us, The DAE was full of life. Since we last visited, The New York Institute for Social Media was in ‘the pink room’ (which I was relieved about because that was the absolute, one colored room I did not want!) and Harquin Creative Group was in the ‘blue room.’ There were interns all about, classes in session and freelancers coming and going. And during it all, there was Chris Dessi walking up and down the hall on the phone with clients all day long- also heads down on churring out work all day and night.

counterspace and Silverback Social’s WDS14 Work:

One day out of the blue, Brett and Chris started chatting in the hallway about this and that and Chris mentioned he had some design needs. A few days later, Brett went and sat down with Chris and they talked about creating logos for the Westchester Digital Summit and for Chris’s personal website. They talked about the future goals of each project and what kind of feeling the identity marks should evoke, what style Chris responds to, and what he doesn’t, and other bits of information.

Brett returned to his desk and within a few days time generated a series of logo marks for Chris Dessi and for The Westchester Digital Summit. Chris was very excited about the logos and was eager to continue working together. Together, they began to churn out really high quality work starting with a brochure for the Westchester Digital Summit, which included photography that Brett took specifically for it.  From there, they moved onto a large format poster to be used at Westchester Airport and they are currently finishing up the website for WDS.

In addition, we began to execute a new website for Chris’s personal blog featuring all the many things about Chris such as hiring him for speaking engagements, advertising his published book, featuring him as a founder of the digital summit, linking him as the CEO and founder of Silverback and more- he’s a busy guy! counterspace came up with a innovative design for ChristopherDessi.com that will accomplish the goals of featuring “all that is Chris” in a classy way. That site will be launching soon and we are all excited to see it go live! What’s next? Well… we’ll all have to wait and see.

We (counterspace) were very eager to start working on the Westchester Digital Summit, partially because we attended last year and were energized about the concept then, and now this is one just way we get to be a part of it for year 2. The more successful we are at branding it, the more successful it becomes and that is good not only for counterspace, but for all of corporate Westchester, specifically digital agencies.

Best Part of Coworking at The DAE:

The advantage Silverback and counterspace have in the coworking environment at The DAE is proximity. By being in adjacent offices, feedback is delivered in person and instantaneously, questions and answers can be tackled at each other’s desks, gut reactions can be gaged and responded to when sharing deliverables and, most of all, ideas get shared and goals get discussed. Becoming an extension of each other’s teams results in successful projects, positive moral and a sharing of each other’s expertise in a noncompetitive environment. Coworking is truly about working alongside each other, learning and growing by leveraging each other’s areas of expertise, experiences and sharing in each others successes.

We have been at The DAE for 3 months now and we are confident we made the right move for counterspace. We’ve met fabulous people, we like coming to work, talking about projects we are working on, hearing about other people’s projects and even sharing weekend stories. Silverback, Harquin, counterspace and The DAE are currently collaborating on how to work with interns collectively rather than having a “counterspace intern” and a “DAE intern.” We are stronger as one and although we are all still learning the ins and outs of all the agencies and people who call The DAE home, there is an energy happening that assures me we are all moving in the right direction.

The Westchester Digital Summit 2014 will be held on May 15th, 2014 at the White Plains Ritz Carlton. For more information, please contact JohnZanzarella@SilverbackSocial.com or ChrisDessi@SilverbackSocial.com.

Blogging on Blogging

by Megan Johnson, intern

The views expressed in this blog are solely my own and do not reflect the views of The Digital Arts Experience in any way. 

As a marketing intern at The DAE, I manage all of our social media channels, which includes this WordPress blog. Before coming to The DAE, however, I’d gotten my feet wet in all different types of blogging sites throughout the years: Xanga (embarrassing), MySpace’s blogging feature (hyperemotional), Blogspot (nothing of relevance to say), Tumblr (also hyperemotional, but with photos and GIFs!), and finally WordPress. Using these blogging mediums for the past eleven years (am I that old?), I’ve clearly found purpose in writing in an online journal of sorts. So, if you’ll bear with me for one of my less emotional posts, here are a few reasons I’ve stuck with blogging my entire Internet life:

1. Community

The people you connect with on blogs are different from those you meet in your everyday life. If you’re anything like me, you’re unlikely to walk into the nearest grocery store, for example, and form a deep connection with the next person you meet. Chances are they’re from the same town, have the same routines as you, and that their life story is not that different from yours. But online, you surround yourself with people with whom you share similar interests. You can connect over things that perhaps your friends don’t have an interest in. You find people who have been down all different walks of life and they expose you to a wider world.

As a Irish-Catholic girl growing up in a very small Irish and Italian-American town, I didn’t know too much about what other people were experiencing beyond the typical Eastchester situations. Having a blog and following others’ blogs helped me to see what was going on beyond the four walls of my room and see things in a different light.

2. Expression

As I mentioned earlier, sometimes my blogs would get a little hyperemotional. But, for the most part, they acted as a healthy outlet for the stressful feelings that come with adolescence and growing up. I identify as a writer: of stories, poems, songs and, well, blogs. So, to have a place I could turn to just by turning on my computer did a world of good for me. I wrote to express everything that I was feeling: stress, sadness, excitement, fear, anxiety, happiness, all of that. It helped to clear my head and keep up my spirits in times of change.

3. Education

I support certain causes very passionately, specifically those involved with mental illness, and while I wasn’t being thoroughly educated about these issues in school or on the news, I was able to stay up to date through blogs. I learned about the different laws, movements, attempts to raise awareness, spokespeople and what was being done overall to reach out to those who struggled with mental illness. It was an education that I couldn’t obtain beyond maybe a day of Health class in school or on the evening news aside from the tragic stories. Following sites like TWLOHA (To Write Love On Her Arms), an anti-suicide nonprofit, NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Health), and individual bloggers kept me informed and intelligent on the causes I cared about. On a lighter note, I also follow blogs that provide a certain type of education that I can’t get in school: sports! As a huge Mets fan, I need to stay up-to-date on my boys in orange and blue to be as true of a fan as I can be. So, Mets blogs are a huge part of my blogging experience as well.

4. Inspiration

As a writer and as a frequently stressed college student, I often need a pick-me-up. Early on, there were Xanga sites (does anyone even remember these?) that posted song lyrics and cheesy GIFs to try and make the angsty middle schoolers of that day and age feel a little less mopey and a little more glittery, I guess. Then, with Tumblr, we gained the ability to reblog these images and lyrics, but with the added sophistication of the format, GIFs, and the quality of the quotes. As silly as it may sound to those who never used Xanga/Tumblr, that action of reblogging to save that inspiration for later did a lot. I had a little tag going on my Tumblr called “inspiration” so that if I ever needed a pick-me-up, well, there it was:

“Allow yourself to be a beginner; no one starts off excellent.”

Except for me, of course. But that’s an entirely different story.

5. Growth

What have I learned from blogging? How have I grown? I have been exposed to people from all over the world who are eerily similar to me (sometimes making me think, do I have a clone?). I’ve been a resource to others and they’ve helped me in turn. I learn about the causes I care about and ones I didn’t know existed. My eyes are opened to different opinions and I’m supported by those whose opinions I share. Many times, in today’s day and age, we are told that our connections are so fake because we’re friends with people we don’t really know that well on Facebook or we feel more comfortable talking to certain people online, that we’re not engaged in the “real world.”

But I’d like to argue the opposite opinion: I think we are more engaged in the real world than ever. Instead of limiting ourselves, I feel as though we’ve grown by expanding our interests, knowledge, experiences, and, in general, our reality through the Internet. My reality was once the comfortable life in a New York City suburb, and though I won’t say that I know everything about everything (chances are I’m close), I’ve learned a lot more about the world from being immersed in the blogosphere. I’ve encountered people who have really struggled in their lifetime, stories that aren’t mainstream newsworthy enough, movements that connect people across the world, and it has been a beautiful experience.

I can’t wait to see what else I learn in the years to come. Because even as I finish up my formal education this year, I know I will still have so much more to learn from the wider blogging community.

Learning About Vine and Stop-Motion Animation in Westchester

Image representing Vine as depicted in CrunchBase

Image by None via CrunchBase

by Megan Johnson, intern

Ever since Vine, the app that lets you record looping 6-second videos, debuted in January of this year, it has been a hit amongst stop-motion animators. All a Vine recording requires is that you press your thumb down on the screen to record and lift it to stop. So, for stop-motion aficionados, that easily translates to creating your own stop-motion animations.
For those of you who are interested in exploring the stop-motion world, check out these tips, provided by the pro Viners themselves: 

1. Come up with an idea!

No (successful) stop-motion clip can be spontaneous. Plan out what you’re going to do in your 6 seconds and figure out what your goal is for this Vine. Pro Viner, Frank Danna, recommends asking yourself, “Wouldn’t it be cool if…?” if you have “Viner’s Block.”

2. Plan. Rome wasn’t Vined in a day!

Much like longer-length productions, you’ll need to organize your Vine by breaking down your shots and figuring out what you’ll have to do – for more complex Vines, this may involve storyboarding! This helps you stay on track and constant throughout the filming process. “I typically begin with rough sketches or written walkthroughs that help me keep the story of my Vine intact and insure consistency from start to finish,” says Danna.

From here, you can figure out not only where your Vine will end up, but also what props and camera angles you may need. If you want to ensure steady shots, get a tripod or a makeshift tripod to keep your stop-motion animation looking flawless.

3. Cut frequently!

You’ve got way more time than you think you have. 6 seconds seems long to us, but in the realm of stop-motion animation, it’s a long time. You have so many possibilities!

Just look at Ben Wyatt (on NBC’s Parks and Recreation) as his hard work of three weeks led to 3 seconds of stop-motion:

Don’t worry, yours won’t be as bad.

4. Use the ghost feature!

Some of you may not even realize this exists, but pro Viner and video producer Ian Padgham recommends using Vine’s ghost feature. It allows you to have a ghost layer while you’re filming, so that if you bump the shot at all, you can view the last scene with ease by tapping the ghost in the bottom right corner

5. Take a screenshot for looping!

Padgham also recommends that, if you want to have a great, smoothly looping Vine, you should take a screenshot of your first shot so that you know exactly how to end your video to look just like the beginning.

Maybe you can even aspire to be as great as these guys (but don’t be ashamed if your first attempt isn’t quite as awe-inducing!)

Happy Vining and hope you have as much fun with it as we do! Check out our Vines by following @thedaexperience.


Love Vine? Check out these great Vine articles that have more tips and more awesome animations!

Interested in having your kids learn stop-motion animation?
Our next Stop-Motion with Legos class at The Digital Arts Experience for ages 9-12 will begin December 4th!
Click here for more information.